Like Europe We Have Our Own Problems

Lately, the media has been extensively covering the bad financial news coming out of Europe. Meanwhile, the financial problems here in the U.S. have persisted. This is not intended to downplay the importance of Europe to our economy and the global financial system. On the other hand, we have our own critical economic headwinds to be concerned with.

For starters, we have many states and localities that are nearly bankrupt. This is somewhat comparable to the members of the European Union. States, like European Union countries, cannot control their own money supply. Therefore, they have to raise taxes and cut benefits. One key difference, however, is that states don’t have the option to leave the union unlike the members of the EU.

The federal deficit is one of the biggest problems we currently face. The aging demographics only compounds the problem. Medicare especially will add strain to our government’s financial problems. The mushrooming costs of Medicare are simply not sustainable. In the future, our health care system will have to adapt and become more cost efficient. Health care costs have been rising much faster than incomes and inflation.

Our national debt has reached a level in which it will be a drag on the economy. According to Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff’s This Time is Different, large federal deficits are a drag on economic growth. In this type of situation, government spending crowds out private investment. In addition, government spending has a slightly negative multiplier on the economy. This is the opposite of private investment.

The odds of government debt default are very high once a nation’s debt to GDP (Gross Domestic Product) ratio gets to be over 90%. That said, the term ‘default’ is much broader than simply failing to make the payments. The most common form of default is through inflation. In this situation, the decrease in value of a country’s currency reduces its debt burden. This is a form of cheating creditors because they are being repaid with money that’s less valuable compared to the principal that was originally lent.

In the end, large and growing federal deficits lead to subpar economic growth. Recovery from large deficits can be long and painful. At best, we will go through a muddle through period. This is a period similar to the environment we are currently in. Yes, GDP is growing. On the other hand, the growth rate is slow with unemployment persistently high. To many, this feels as if the last recession never ended. This has all happened despite the fact that the government has been on a spending binge.

The largest spending binges occur after financial crises according to the research done by Reinhart and Rogoff. The financial crisis of 2008 was no exception. In the long run, however, the extra spending will only add to the problem.

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